Posts Tagged ‘ Preptober ’

Plot: Sketch, #Preptober Day 26

Today it's finally time to start plotting that novel. There's a little less than a week left in Preptober, and we've got to get to the heart of this story, stat! Whenever I start outlining my novels, I usually do some brainstorming to begin with. As explained in this post on outlining, I jot down every bit and piece no matter how wild and crazy and off track it may sound, and then sort through Continue Reading...

Scenes: Emotions, #Preptober, Day 25

Today's topic: How do we make sure that our scenes are conveying the right kinds of emotions? One of the most important things your scenes need to do is strike the right emotional chord, which involves setting the mood. A scene about losing your family in the forest, for instance, should call up feelings of fear and frustration in your character, leading to distress – and possibly even Continue Reading...

Scenes: Character Motivation, #Preptober, Day 24

Today, you might be wondering why it seems like we're dipping back into character development, as the topic of our prompt is Character Motivation. But guess what? Character's motivations also affect your scenes! Let's explore. When crafting your scenes, you obviously want to have logical actions following one after another in time – unless you're playing with timelines and experimenting Continue Reading...

Scenes: Subplots, #Preptober Day 23

Yesterday we talked about our main plot. Today it's time to talk about subplots. First of all, what's a subplot? The most basic definition is a "subordinate or secondary plot." But why do you want or need these, and what is the purpose of subplots? Subplots typically deal with additional elements in your story, such as a romance or conflict between two characters. These are usually Continue Reading...

Scenes: Main Plot, #Preptober Day 22

It's Day 22 of Preptober, which means it's high time we started plotting this story! Let's start small: What's your story about? Think about the main story you plan to tell, and put it into one sentence that will convey the gist to your audience. This is often referred to as the "elevator pitch" or the "logline." Your pitch should be: [author_list style="star"] Short To the Continue Reading...