Posts Tagged ‘ NaNoWriMo ’

#HumpDayReviews: My 2015 Year in Review

Happy Hump Day! As it's almost 2016, I've been going through my paper agenda, blog posts, Goodreads account, and various notebooks to review my year in reading and writing. So, instead of a book review, today I'm actually reviewing my own life. I'm sorting out exactly what I accomplished this year – both the successes and the failures – in order to help set some SMART goals for Continue Reading...

Photo of the Day: Wizarding powers, engage! #NaNoWriMo

(via Instagram http://ift.tt/1S5lJjC) P.S. Aren't female wizards actually... witches? I realize that "NaNoWriMo Witch" doesn't have quite the same ring to it as "NaNoWriMo Wizard," but just being factually accurate Continue Reading...

101 ways to kill someone in a convent

Okay, so I actually only managed to come up with 16 (plus a few I can't mention, because they're already in play and I wouldn't want to ruin the surprise), but here are some of the ways I've contemplated killing the characters in my NaNo novel, The Case of the Cunning Linguist, which is set in and around Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris: [author_list style="plus"] Choking on communion Continue Reading...

My plans for November: reading, writing, Facebook fasting

This November is already off to a wacky start, isn't it? First we celebrated Halloween, then we "fell back," and today we've got a whole extra hour to write our NaNoWriMo novels! Well, we would have if we'd actually gotten up at the usual time, instead of sleeping in. I decided to sleep in, 'cause I'm lazy like that. What about you? A word on NaNoWriMo Updates In case you've been Continue Reading...

#NaNoWriMo prep: The Simple Art of Murder

As part of my NaNoWriMo prep, I've been reading Raymond Chandler's essay, "The Simple Art of Murder," from 1950. In it, the author condemns traditional detective stories, as he argues they can never be realistic enough nor rise to the level of great literature. He then proposes the type of detective story that can elude such problems, noting "in everything that can be called art there is a Continue Reading...